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Shota Matitashvili

Dr. Shota Matitashvili (შოთა მათითაშვილი) graduated from the Department of Humanities at the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University in 2011. In 2014 he earned his Master’s degree at the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University. In 2021 he earned his second Master’s degree at the Central European University (Vienna). In 2018 he defended his PhD. thesis ‘History of Georgian Monasticism in the 4th-8th Centuries’’ at the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University. Between 2011 and 2014 he worked at the Simon Janashia Georgian National Museum. Since 2015 he has been a lecturer at the Ivane Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University.

The main topic of his academic research is Georgian medieval history; the religious, social and political history of Georgia in late antiquity; and Georgia in the context of Byzantine and Sassanid Persia.

His articles and books chiefly discuss the issues of early Georgian Christianity.

  1. ‘Female Asceticism in Late Antique Georgian Literature: The Origins of the Vita of St. Nino,’ Vigiliae Christianae 75 (2021): 253-277. 

  2. ‘The Monasteries Founded by the Thirteen Syrian Fathers in Iberia: the Rise of Monasticism in Sixth-Century Georgia,’ Studies in Late Antiquity, Vol. 2. No. 1, Spring, 2018: 439 (University of California Press) http://sla.ucpress.edu/content/2/1/4 

  3. ‘The Religious-Philosophical Foundation of Christian Asceticism, ‘Religiur-Pilosopiuri Mimomkhilveli (Religious-Philosophical Reviewer) N 6 (2018) (in Georgian).

  4. The History of Georgian Monasticism: Fourth and Fifth Centuries (Tbilisi, 2017) (monograph, in Georgian)

  5. ‘Dimitri Purtseladze at the Origins of New Church Historiography,’ Kartuli Tskarotmtsodneoba (Georgian Source Studies), N 15-16 (in Georgian). 2012 – ‘At the Origins of Georgian Monasticism,’ Sami Saunje (Three Treasures), N 1 (in Georgian). 

‘The Georgian Church in the 4th Century and the first half of the 5th century, and Persian politics towards Christian Countries of Transcaucasia,’ Kristianobis Kvlevebi, N 6 (2011) (in Georgian).

Articles

25/04/2024

KING PARNAVAZ

The story of Parnavaz (299-234 B.C.) begins with a legend about the military expedition of Alexander the Great in Iberia (eastern Georgia or Kartli). Alexander conquered all the lands of the known world, and during his glorious conquests he also visited Iberia.

25/04/2024

THE GOLDEN KINGDOM OF COLCHIS

Colchis was the first definitive political formation created by the ancestors of modern Georgians. It emerged in the lands of western Georgia (while another ancient Georgian kingdom, that of Iberia, was established in eastern Georgia).

25/04/2024

EQUAL TO THE APOSTLES AND THE ENLIGHTENER OF GEORGIA

This is the fascinating and miraculous story about the conversion of the Iberian (eastern Georgian) Kingdom to Christianity at the beginning of the fourth century.

25/04/2024

KING DAVID IV THE RESTORER

Since George was unable to solve the major problems that Georgia was facing, he abdicated and placed the crown on the head of his sixteen-year-old son, David. This young man represented new hope for the Georgian Kingdom. The once glorious kingdom was now completely helpless, and lay in ruins.

25/04/2024

QUEEN TAMAR AND THE GOLDEN AGE OF THE GEORGIAN KINGDOM

The reign of Queen Tamar was a unique event, not only in the history of Medieval Georgia, but also in the history of Medieval Christendom as a whole. This female king ruled her kingdom as a true and lawful ruler in her own right.

25/04/2024

KING VAKHTANG I GORGASALI

King Vakhtang I Gorgasali (ca. 442–502) was arguably the greatest Georgian king of late antiquity. From the early Middle Ages onwards, he became one of the main protagonists of Georgian folklore - a great king whose power could shake even the icy peaks of the Caucasus; a fierce fighter with superhuman strength and bravery. Unfortunately for scholars, most medieval accounts about King Vakhtang are predominantly legendary. However, that does not mean he did not exist and was invented later, nor is he as legendary as, say, King Arthur. Indeed, most scholars agree that King Vakhtang was a historical figure who ruled the Kingdom of Iberia in the late fifth century.

AUTHORS AT ATINATI